THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITTMAN EBOOK

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The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines. Read an Excerpt. download. Look Inside download the Ebook: Kobo · Barnes & Noble · Apple · Books A. Read "The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman" by Ernest J. Gaines available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. "This is a. Editorial Reviews. Review. “Stunning. I know of no black novel about the South that exudes download a site site eBooks site Unlimited Prime Reading Best Sellers & More site Book Deals Free Reading Apps site Singles Newsstand .


The Autobiography Of Miss Jane Pittman Ebook

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cover image of The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. Read A Sample. The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. by Ernest J. Gaines. ebook Miss Jane Pittman, like Dilsey, has 'endured,' has seen almost everything and foretold the rest. Try Libby, our new app for enjoying ebooks and audiobooks! ×. Title details for The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines - Available. The autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. [Ernest J Gaines] -- Story of a black lady born into slavery on a Louisiana plantation, freed at the end.

It was a Yankee soldier gave me his daughter's own name, Jane Brown. He told me after the war to come see him in Ohio. She had Master hold me down and she beat me with a cat-o-nine tales an' put me to work in the fields. I don't even know what happened to my Pap. I barely remember my Ma'am. They killed her when I was bout five. It was more than a year after the war Master told us we was emancipated. We could stay but he couldn't pay us nothin'. But we could work on shares. It was slavery all over again.

About half of us left.

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Big Laura you'd call the leader. She carried her baby daughter. I watched after her boy Ned. We didn't know where we was goin' or how we was goin' to live. We only knew we were free at last. Then one day the Patrollers found us. They was like the Ku Klux. They killed ever one of us except me n' Ned. I had been able to keep him quiet. I found big Laura. Them men had even killed Laura's girl child. The Patrollers I made up my mind I was gonna get to Ohio no matter what.

Ned, he took two stones, flint stones from his Ma'am. He carried them with him wherever he went. I guess it was his way of remembering his Ma'am.

But I think ever time he struck them rocks together what he was makin' was the spark of freedom Laura had wanted for him n' ever body else. Each day we walked. But we was still in Luzanna. I hung on to finding freedom in Ohio until one night we came up on the house of an old white man. He had been a sailor at one point in his life. He had maps ever where in his house. He told me I'd have to cross Mississippi or up through Arkansas n' I might take my whole life gettin' to Ohio.

He told me he could be Secesh or he could be a friend of my people. You know I think he was a friend of my people. He could jus' as easy told me sure you take on off for Ohio. So I decided to stay in Luzanna n' find my freedom there some day. I took work on a plantation. Ned was in a school. I never looked on Ned as mine until his teacher had him read his lesson to me n' I was so proud of him I loved him as if he were my own.

The only good that come to my people after the war was when the Beero showed up.

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We were freed men and women. But it didn't last. The North made up with the South, and those northern businessmen came down South to make money with the white businessmen. I took Joe Pittman, the horse breaker on the plantation as my husband.

I couldn't have chilren of my own. The doctor said I had been beat so bad when I was still a slave I had been hurt inside. There was no horse Joe couldn't break. A big rancher hired him to come out to Texas n' made Joe, a black man, his head horse man. But there's always a horse a man can't break. I lost Joe. N' from then on I was just Miss Jane Pittman. I went back to Luzanna. My Ned came home from Kansas. He was full of ideas. He had been down to Cuba in that Spanish American War.

He talked about not holdin' with the Booker T. Washington sayin' that the black people needed to stay off from the white folks, work hard and stand on there on.

He took after the ideas of Frederick Douglas n' said that this world was for all folks black n' white. He was a teacher. I still remember hearin' him talkin' to the chilren on the plantation. He would sit on my porch n' talk.

He'd drink tea with me, n' we'd go fishin together' sometimes. Albert would talk about killin' like it was nuthin'. Albert told me if Ned didn't stop his teachin' n' leave, he'd been told to kill him. N' he said he'd do what he was told to do.

Ned wouldn't leave. Even knowin' he was going to die. One night Albert Cluveau met my Ned on the road n' shot him through the chest with a shot gun. Black people have had to fight for whatever they ever got. Ned would never quit. But I sure miss him. There was more wars. There's always wars. I thought after all our young men fought the Germans n' Japanese things might be changin'.

There was even a black man played baseball for the Dodgers. I never missed Jackie Robinson when he was playin' for the Dodgers. But things hadn't really changed. He was the son of sharecroppers on the plantation. We all thought he might be The One, who would grow up n' make a difference for our people. We wanted him to make a preacher or a teacher.

Jimmy went off to school. They sent him back home to us. He told us we hadn't even begun to fight in Luzanna. Jimmy asked us all to meet him at the Courthouse the next mornin', gonna get us some civil rights. I plan on goin'. He reminds me a lot of my Ned. But Albert Cluveau's been long dead. I'm not sure if I'm or I'm a , but freedom's been a long time comin'. Gaines filled The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman with so much historical content, and the voice of Jane Pittman carried such a sense of truth, that upon its original publication, many people thought the novel was non-fiction.

Gaines said, "Some people have asked me whether or not The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman is fiction or nonfiction.

Ernest J. Gaines, an author I'm grateful to have discovered My reading of Gaines has not followed my usual practice.

I've read him as I've found him. Each has affected me deeply, but I chose to share my thoughts regarding Jane Pittman because of the magnificent voice of the protagonist and the sweep of history seen through the eyes of one person, with the assistance of those who shared parts of their lives with her and lived around her.

The autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

Gaines structures his novel as a series of interviews of Jane Pittman conducted by an unseen and unnamed teacher of history. The "Teacher" emerges much as Homer does in The Odyssey , calling on Jane Pittman to tell of her personal odyssey to freedom from the final days of her life as a slave during the American Civil War up to the Civil Rights Movement of the early s.

A Note From The Teacher "I had been trying to get Miss Jane Pittman to tell me her story of her life for several years now, but each time I asked her she told me there was no story to tell. I told her she was over a hundred years old, she had been a slave in this country so there had to be a story So I asked him when he wanted to get started. He had one of those recorders. One thing led to something else. Sometimes I wasn't able to remember.

But there were all those of my people around me who were my memory when it was gone. The Teacher said it was all our story. I guess it was. When you are born a slave like I was you don't own anything. Not even your ma'am and Pap get to name you.

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The Mistress named me Ticey. I didn't start out as Jane Pittman. It was near the end of the war. The Secesh come through. Mistress told me to take water out to them. One boy said if it was up to him, he would let the niggers go, but it wasn't up to him. Then the Yankees came on following the Secesh. It was a Yankee soldier gave me his daughter's own name, Jane Brown.

He told me after the war to come see him in Ohio. She had Master hold me down and she beat me with a cat-o-nine tales an' put me to work in the fields. I don't even know what happened to my Pap. I barely remember my Ma'am. They killed her when I was bout five. It was more than a year after the war Master told us we was emancipated.

We could stay but he couldn't pay us nothin'. But we could work on shares. It was slavery all over again. About half of us left. Big Laura you'd call the leader. She carried her baby daughter. I watched after her boy Ned.

We didn't know where we was goin' or how we was goin' to live. We only knew we were free at last. Then one day the Patrollers found us. They was like the Ku Klux.

They killed ever one of us except me n' Ned. I had been able to keep him quiet. I found big Laura. Them men had even killed Laura's girl child. The Patrollers I made up my mind I was gonna get to Ohio no matter what. Ned, he took two stones, flint stones from his Ma'am.

He carried them with him wherever he went. I guess it was his way of remembering his Ma'am. But I think ever time he struck them rocks together what he was makin' was the spark of freedom Laura had wanted for him n' ever body else.

Each day we walked. But we was still in Luzanna. I hung on to finding freedom in Ohio until one night we came up on the house of an old white man. He had been a sailor at one point in his life. He had maps ever where in his house. He told me I'd have to cross Mississippi or up through Arkansas n' I might take my whole life gettin' to Ohio. He told me he could be Secesh or he could be a friend of my people.

You know I think he was a friend of my people.

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He could jus' as easy told me sure you take on off for Ohio. So I decided to stay in Luzanna n' find my freedom there some day. I took work on a plantation. Ned was in a school. I never looked on Ned as mine until his teacher had him read his lesson to me n' I was so proud of him I loved him as if he were my own.

The only good that come to my people after the war was when the Beero showed up. We were freed men and women. But it didn't last.

The North made up with the South, and those northern businessmen came down South to make money with the white businessmen. I took Joe Pittman, the horse breaker on the plantation as my husband. I couldn't have chilren of my own.

The doctor said I had been beat so bad when I was still a slave I had been hurt inside. There was no horse Joe couldn't break. A big rancher hired him to come out to Texas n' made Joe, a black man, his head horse man. But there's always a horse a man can't break. I lost Joe. N' from then on I was just Miss Jane Pittman. I went back to Luzanna. My Ned came home from Kansas.

He was full of ideas. He had been down to Cuba in that Spanish American War. He talked about not holdin' with the Booker T. Washington sayin' that the black people needed to stay off from the white folks, work hard and stand on there on. He took after the ideas of Frederick Douglas n' said that this world was for all folks black n' white. He was a teacher. I still remember hearin' him talkin' to the chilren on the plantation.

He would sit on my porch n' talk. He'd drink tea with me, n' we'd go fishin together' sometimes. Albert would talk about killin' like it was nuthin'. Albert told me if Ned didn't stop his teachin' n' leave, he'd been told to kill him. N' he said he'd do what he was told to do. Ned wouldn't leave.The Famished Road. There was no horse Joe couldn't break.

David Bradley. It will be a clean slate for others to begin underlining the passages they love and to make their own notes. He was full of ideas. We shook on our exchange. He told me I'd have to cross Mississippi or up through Arkansas n' I might take my whole life gettin' to Ohio.

The Secesh come through. MediaObject , schema: A fictional biography of woman born into slavery who lives through the Civil Rights Movement.